main promo background

Sainsbury's Book Club

Every month, we choose our favourite eBooks we’ve read over the past few weeks that we think you’ll like. To help you get the most out of our selections, we’ve gathered together a range of free samples, book trailers, author biographies and reading group discussion points.

We'd love you to contribute to the Book Club too, so if you like what you read, recommend it to others by reviewing the books on the list. Reviewing books is simple and satisfying, so get involved.

You can also find extra book club resources, including Q&As, author-penned articles, excerpts and videos on the Book Club section of our blog here.

Collect 100 bonus Nectar points on this week's Book Club recommendation

Etta and Otto and Russell and James

Emma Hooper

£3.99 £5.99 or 798 points
Instant Buy
Collect 3 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"It’s written in a delightful way making the book a pleasure to read"

Vivien says:

After reading just a few chapters I knew this book was going to be captivating! It’s like reading a fairy tale. It’s both magical and moving as the characters progress into old age.

Etta is an 82 -year-old woman who decides to walk to the sea, 2,000 miles away from her hometown Saskatchewan. She has never seen the ocean before. She leaves her husband Otto and takes with her a rifle, some chocolate and best walking boots. Etta is now becoming very forgetful. She writes a note to her husband saying she will try and remember to come home! She leaves various recipe cards for him to follow.

Etta and Otto live on a farm in a very remote town. Their neighbour, Russell, a friend of Otto’s is an admirer of Etta’s and still loves her after more than 50 years. This is a beautiful story and begins before the start of World War Two. She was a teacher at the local school where Otto and Russell were pupils. Otto is eventually enlisted and leaves to fight in the war whilst Russell, disabled by an accident stayed behind. Etta’s school was closed down so she worked in a munitions factory. Otto and Etta exchange letters to each other, but Russell’s love for her develops.

The story follows Etta’s adventures on her long and difficult walk to the sea. Her companion is a coyote called James, who can talk and sing; a warm and loving character. Etta becomes well known on her journey, welcomed along the way and given small gifts. Otto is content to patiently wait for her return and follow her cooking instructions, but Russell decides to try and find Etta and starts a long walk. It’s written in a delightful way making the book a pleasure to read.

It’s beautiful and mystical, sometimes difficult to separate Etta’s dementia from her dreams and reality. I had to read a few pages twice to piece it all together. Sometimes I found it confusing, but well worth reading. A truly lovely book, that is well written with a delightful story and unique style of its own.

Other Book Club Reads

Mightier than the Sword

Jeffrey Archer

Released: 2015

£3.49 £5.99 or 698 points
Instant Buy
Collect 3 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"I love the main characters in this book, as they come across as real life people"

Pete says:

This book is the next instalment of the Clifton Chronicles that follows the ongoing feud between the Clifton and the Barrington families. I’ve read the previous volume, Be Careful What You Wish For, but reckon it can be read as standalone.

The story is set in the 60s and early 70s. It starts with the maiden voyage of the new liner, MV Buckingham, a part of the Barrington Shipping fleet, which gets bombed by the IRA. Then it’s game on as the Barrington clan decide to fight dirty to get revenge.

Jeffrey Archer has made a good use of his past political career to weave the plot. He shows an in-depth knowledge of the politics of the period, and includes real life politicians, such as Ted Heath and other major players of the day. I love the main characters in this book, as they come across as real life people, facing the issues of modern times. Altogether it makes House of Cards look like a child’s school play!

The only minor grudge is that the book ends without a final ending. Although Kirkus reviews called it a “turbo-charged cliffhanger” I was annoyed to be left hanging on until the next book.

A Game for All the Family

Sophie Hannah

Released: 2015

£9.99 or 1998 points
Instant Buy
Collect 9 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"Definitely the book of the year so far"

Sean says:

A Game for All the Family is my first Sophie Hannah book, but will most definitely not be my last!

The story follows Justine Merrison as she leaves behind her stressful career in London and takes her family to a new home and new life in Devon. And her aim once she gets there? To do absolutely “Nothing. With a capital N.”

Fortunately for us this proves to be far from the case, as things begin to take a strange turn. Shortly after the move Justine starts to receive anonymous threatening phone calls; and then there’s the strange, macabre story her daughter is secretly writing, which couldn’t possibly be a true story could it? On top of that, her daughter’s best friend seems to have disappeared from the face of the Earth, if indeed he was real in the first place! Even his school teachers deny he ever existed.

As the intrigue continues and each twist and turn of the story in revealed, you begin to realise what a fantastic writer Sophie Hannah is. Each character is highly believable, and despite their flaws you care about what is happening to them. And as the story unfolds, you are completely enveloped in its world.

For me this is definitely the book of the year so far.

The Paying Guests

Sarah Waters

Released: 2014

£3.99 or 798 points
Instant Buy
Collect 3 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"At times I felt as though I daren't breathe, the situation was so tense."

Sharon says:

This is Sarah Waters back at the top of her game. It’s her first visit to the 1920s and a tense, post-war London where, in a large now silent house bereft of brothers, husband and even servants, life is about to be transformed as an impoverished widow and her spinster daughter are obliged to take in lodgers.

Compelling from the very first page, beautifully written and incredibly atmospheric - at times I felt as though I daren't breathe, the situation was so tense. I loved Fingersmith and Night Watch – this is absolutely on a par with both of them.

.

Touch

Claire North

Released: 2015

£4.99 or 998 points
Instant Buy
Collect 4 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"A fascinating, unique and gripping read"

Nicole says:

A fascinating, unique and gripping read. Touch follows the life (or lives) of a human ghost who has the ability to move into the body of another person by touching them. At the start of the book we see the ghost narrowly survive a murder attempt, only to witness the unnecessary murder of Josephine, the woman who it previously inhabited. Named, ‘Kepler’ by its hunters, the ghost embarks on a tense and perilous journey to find out why it is being hunted, by whom; and most importantly, why the innocent Josephine was also targeted.

This book flits between past and present, following the ghost’s plight to solve the mystery of his/her present predicament, while also re-living significant moments from the past which help the reader to understand the complexities of the ghost’s existence. Each chapter brings further insight into the many facets of the ghost’s personality, feeding the reader’s desire to learn more about who ‘Kepler’ was in human form and who he/she is now. The exciting twists in the story mean that the reader is constantly finding new unanswered questions, making the book hard to put down.

Touch is a brilliant book, wonderfully written by Claire North, whose attention to detail and depth in her writing mean that the reader completely buys-in to the concept. I have not yet read North’s first book, The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, but after reading Touch, I will certainly be buying it.

The Taming of the Queen

Philippa Gregory

Released: 2015

£9.99 or 1998 points
Instant Buy
Collect 9 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"Riveting and absorbing"

Sharon says:

This is the story of Henry VIII’s sixth wife – Katherine (or Kateryn) Parr – told in the first person, from Henry VIII’s marriage proposal through to the king’s death almost four years later. It brings to life Kateryn’s complicated feelings throughout the marriage, everything from revulsion and terror at the outset to pity and a genuine fondness for Henry and his three children.

Up until now Philippa Gregory’s Tudor novels have covered much written about subjects with complex plots, numerous characters and detailed family trees. This is different in that the focus is one individual – Kateryn Parr – it’s a far more straightforward read, no less riveting or absorbing and one of the first I’ve read about Henry VIII’s sixth wife, so from that point of view, refreshing too. You don't have to be a fan of Philippa Gregory or interested in 'enery the eighth to enjoy this book.

Edge of Eternity

Ken Follett

Released: 2014

£3.99 £6.99 or 798 points
Instant Buy
Collect 3 Nectar points
By clicking "Instant buy" I wish my download to start as soon as possible and I agree to the Terms of Sale of this purchase.

"Edge of Eternity is a terrific read. The stories are gripping, the characters are young, hopeful and attractive to read about."

Jon says:

Edge of Eternity is a terrific read. I haven’t read Fall of Giants or Winter of the World, which are the first two parts of the trilogy that this book concludes, but this didn’t affect my enjoyment of the installment. The story – or stories (there are lots) – don’t relate to what happened in the earlier books, and they are so enjoyable that I didn’t worry that the characters’ relatives who are occasionally mentioned might have had another adventure in a earlier volume.

The trilogy follows four families (German, Russian, English, American and Welsh) through World War I, II and then in this book, the Cold War. It might sound a bit complicated, and there’s even a five-page cast of characters, but I didn’t think I needed it particularly. The characters are young (at the beginning), hopeful and attractive to read about.

Events start in 1961 and finish in 1989, but the 70s only start on page 750. So the final two decades are whistled through in 250 pages. This probably allows us to get more stuck into the 60s stories in a deeper and more satisfying way – it is the most interesting decade too.  I learned quite a lot about the history of the era too.

Finally, I should say that Edge of Eternity is a monster of a book. The paperback is 1003 pages long and weighs as much as a much as a T-Rex’s claw. In short it is the perfect novel to be read as an eBook. I’m now keen to read Vols. I and II.